On The Curbs with Paula Peper, Theodore Judah first graders and Compton’s Market

Paula Peper, a nationally recognized award winning ecologist, tree expert, historian, author, urban forest researcher, and retired United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service employee spoke on Wednesday, Jan. 14, at East Sacramento Preservation's sponsored event inside the East Sacramento Room of the Clunie Community Center.  /  Photo courtesy

Paula Peper, a nationally recognized award winning ecologist, tree expert, historian, author, urban forest researcher, and retired United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service employee spoke on Wednesday, Jan. 14, at East Sacramento Preservation's sponsored event inside the East Sacramento Room of the Clunie Community Center. / Photo courtesy

On Wednesday, Jan. 14, East Sacramento Preservation held the first of its speakers series inside of the East Sacramento Room of the Clunie Community Center. The guest speaker was the renown Paula Peper, a nationally recognized award winning ecologist, tree expert, historian, author, urban forest researcher, and retired United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service employee. It was standing room only for more than 60 attendees. Paula delighted the audience with a slideshow presentation featuring stories about our East Sacramento heritage starting from the days of the Native Americans, and ending in present time.

She captivated the audience by telling many stories related to our historic families, their businesses, and homes many of which still have lasting impacts on our lives today. Skillfully intertwined in this presentation were examples of tree care and planting done the right way (properly spaced and diversified), and the wrong way. Did you know that one storm wiped out more than 600 trees in Sacramento in one day? Next up in the speakers series will be Bill Burg, author and Sacramento Old City Association President. Visit www.eastsacprevervation.org for details.

The umpteenth annual Theodore Judah First Grade Boat Float festival took place on Wednesday, Jan. 28. This is a tradition that goes back in time for who knows exactly how long. Every January each first grader is given 30 days to build a boat. Creativity and imagination are allowed to flow freely as the only requirements are that the boat float, and that it be no larger that the size of a cereal box.

Mrs. Hein, Mrs. Gonsalves, and Mrs. Brown did an amazing job commandeering the approximately 86 7 year olds who participated, with an equal number of spectators, on hand, many of whom had worked hard with their youngsters to prepare for the voyage. Three tubs were filled with water, and one by one the captains were called forward to float their boats for just enough time to snap a few photos and demonstrate that yes indeed their boat does float.

There were pirate ships, luxury lines, rafts, frigates, fishing boats, speed boats, sail boats, floating islands, fire and police boats, houseboats and even some multi-hulled ships. Passengers included ducks, dinosaurs, monkeys, snowmen, princesses, pirates and miniature people, to name just a few. When asked what their favorite part of the boat float was, one first grader perhaps summed it up best when she said: “I liked seeing everybody happy, and that we all got to see each others neat boats!”


Compton’s Market on McKinley Boulevard is getting a new roof but is open during construction. Soon, the location will be offering customers a full fledge deli, juice bar, and a more comprehensive outdoor patio and dining area.  /  Photo by Monica Stark

Compton’s Market on McKinley Boulevard is getting a new roof but is open during construction. Soon, the location will be offering customers a full fledge deli, juice bar, and a more comprehensive outdoor patio and dining area. / Photo by Monica Stark

Other happenings in the community include construction work on the East Sacramento Town Hall, also know as Compton’s Market. Neighbors are noticing the “Open During Construction” sign, the dumpster, caution tape and work crews up on the roof. So what’s it all about?

Well, most immediately, the construction at Compton’s is about replacing the roof of the market. But, what’s in store a few months down the road is the big deal. Although still in the preliminary stages, the plan is to blow out the side of the store facing Meister Way to make room for a full fledge deli, juice bar, and a more comprehensive outdoor patio and dining area. Sounds pretty cool! On the Curbs will be sure to keep you updated as details emerge.

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