Artistic Edge Custom Framing & Gallery Expands

Family owned and operated, Artistic Edge Custom Framing & Gallery, defies the economic odds and continues to grow. What started with a passion and a vision has evolved into a quality custom framing shop and a unique forum for local artists.

It all started with a vision. As a wife, mother and entrepreneur at heart, Kathy Caitano has a talent for creating success in her business ventures.  By 2007, she had already grown and sold two businesses and was ready to invest into a business that connected to her passion for art.  It was in the energetic atmosphere of an art auction, and encouragement from her husband, the idea transformed into action that Kathy Caitano decided to buy her first custom framing and gallery store.  

With her investment made, Kathy’s vision was to transform a 2300 sq. ft. local framing and print shop into a unique platform for original art and quality custom framing.  To Kathy, quality can be affordable and “the bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”.   

This is what she shares everyday with her local community. 

Today, Kathy’s vision has become a reality.  In just 6 years of business, Artistic Edge Custom Framing and Gallery has expanded into 8000 sq. ft. of showroom space and has built a strong connection with the community she serves.  Artistic Edge’s now vast showrooms offer individuals the opportunity to experience original art from local and national artists, find unique and original gifts, and connect to a nostalgic quality of a family owned and operated business.

With continued growth in mind, Artistic Edge moves into their final stage of the transformation with the addition of six individual artist studio spaces.  Here, independent local artists can create and sell their art on site, and become a bigger part of the Artistic Edge family.

“It’s been a slow work in progress and this January we took on more space and have been working so hard.  It’s 85 percent complete and my artist studio spaces will be complete by December,” Caitano told the Arden-Carmichael News. 


Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church has plan to expand

Big plans are underway for The Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, located at the corner of Alhambra and F Street. New facilities, such as a courtyard, education and administration buildings, will replace their aging counterparts. New parking areas will increase parking capacity and a new access drive will improve circulation, on and off site.
After more than 20 years of considering various options to build new facilities at other locations, the parish has committed to renew and invest for the future at its present campus.
To the church community, this renewal represents a like for like replacement of facilities centered on a new campus heart – the Kardia.

bizzHere’s a bit of an overview
-The existing church will remain.  It has a seating capacity of up to 450 people and is 7,380 square feet.
-The Kendron, or multipurpose center (social, cultural, recreational), provides meeting and recreational space as well as a small religious bookstore.  Banquet seating capacity is 450. It’s a total of 22,500 square feet, with 17,000 square feet at the ground level and a 5,500-square-foot mezzanine.
-The education and administrative building provides administrative and education space necessary for operations and ministry functions. The administration wing includes offices for the secretary, priests, and parochial assistants (youth, visiting clergy), a library and meeting rooms. The education wing will support the parish’s daycare/preschool as well as its Sunday schools, youth programs and other various ministries that serve the community at large. This building will have two floors, totaling 16,800 square feet.
A project in phases
The project will be phased.  Phasing depends upon the success of fundraising.  It is envisioned that the Kendron can be initially developed, along with the Kardia and a portion of the parking lot.  Under this scenario, the Parish will continue to operate out of the existing Kendron until the new Kendron completed and ready for occupancy.  The next phase of the Master Plan would include adding the Education/Administration  Building, its adjacent outside play area, the remaining parking lot, the access drive and balance of the  Kardia enhancements.

nightviewA Proud Foundation
For more than 90 years, Greek Orthodox Christians have been served culturally and spiritually at facilities located at 600 Alhambra, just across from McKinley Park in East Sacramento.  Initially the existing Church was constructed in 1952 by a proud group of energetic and patriotic Greek Americans eager to lay the foundation their children’s future and the generations that would follow.  As time went on, the community grew to become an integral part of the Sacramento Metropolitan region and subsequent generations acquired much of the block bounded by F and G streets (to the north and south) and Alhambra Boulevard and 30th Street (to the east and west).
Additional facilities such as the education/administration building and Kendron (Social Hall) were constructed over the years and have come to comprise the Annunciation’s parish campus, which continues to serve Orthodox Christians of many backgrounds and ethnicities.

Changing needs and growth
Over the years the community’s needs have changed significantly from those of a few immigrant families from Greece.  The Annunciation Parish has become a thriving community of over five hundred supporting families with sister parishes in Elk Grove and Roseville.  To better meet present and future needs, the Annunciation  Parish has developed a Campus Master Plan that will replace its aging facilities and create a new parish identity.   In the same manner that earlier generations laid the foundation that enabled the community to grow, the new Campus Master Plan represents the Annunciation’s commitment to future generations, and reflects the Parish’s role as an integral and dynamic community of Sacramento.

A new parish campus vision and master plan
Over the past 20 years the parish has entertained other options to relocate its campus away from the current site, but none came to fruition due to conditions that were beyond the Annunciation’s control.  In June 2010 the parish decided that there was no better place than its present campus upon which to rebuild and renew the spiritual, cultural, and civic connections make up the very fabric of the Annunciation Community.   From this commitment a new Campus Master Plan – to be initiated in phases as resources allow – will enrich and enhance these very connections over the coming years.
The proposed Campus Master Plan is centered and organized around the Kardia (Greek for heart), a multi-function outdoor courtyard where the Annunciation will gather for cultural, religious, social, and community events.
It will front along Alhambra Boulevard and is situated between the existing Church and a new Kendron, which will replace the existing Kendron.  The Kardia will be paved and landscaped with shrubs, lawns and trees which will provide the shade, atmosphere and ambiance to transform the Kardia into a space that enhances the community and serves as the “Heart of the Campus”.
Further, the Kardia is envisioned to act as a complementary visual extension of McKinley Park (across Alhambra Boulevard) through  cool and restful shade found in its arcades and cloisters.  As noted above, the Parish’s existing Church – which fronts on Alhambra across from McKinley Park – will remain, on the north side of the Kardia.

Disclosure: Editor Monica Stark’s husband works for the architecture firm, Comstock Johnson, which is heading up the plans.

Sutter Medical Center expansion features midtown Sacramento’s tallest building

Just west of East Sacramento and across L Street from Sutter General Hospital is an under construction building that is drawing much attention for its size alone. After all, the partially completed structure is shaping up to be midtown Sacramento’s tallest building.

VIEW OF THINGS TO COME. The Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center, shown under construction, will replace East Sacramento’s Sutter Memorial Hospital. The top level of the 10-story structure will feature a life-saving helistop for severely injured and sick patients. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

VIEW OF THINGS TO COME. The Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center, shown under construction, will replace East Sacramento’s Sutter Memorial Hospital. The top level of the 10-story structure will feature a life-saving helistop for severely injured and sick patients. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

Standing about 194 feet tall, the 10-story, 395,241-square-foot structure in its completed state will become known as the Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center and replace Sutter Memorial Hospital at 5151 F St. in East Sacramento.

In addition to its function as a maternity hospital, Sutter Memorial, which is often referred to as the “baby hospital,” presently houses cardiac care services. But Sutter Memorial is considered an aging campus that does not meet today’s needs from a health care consumer or medical technology prospective.

The new, 242-bed facility will provide the highest level of neonatal and pediatric intensive care services, pediatric cardiac care, pediatric neurosurgery services, pediatric cancer services and high-risk and conventional maternity services.

Another major aspect of opening the new facility is the fact that medical staff and hospital management will no longer have to travel back and forth between Sutter’s two Sacramento campuses.

Although it was once contemplated that the new Sutter center would be located on the Sutter Memorial campus, Gary Zavoral, public relations specialist for Sutter Health, Sacramento Sierra Region, said that the selection of the Sutter General site seems to make the most sense in a historical perspective.

“This is where Sutter Hospital started (in 1923), so it kind of made sense that they would go ahead and put this new midtown expansion right here where it all began,” Zavoral said.

Larry Maas, the Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento assistant administrator who oversees the expansion project, described the magnitude of the move from Sutter Memorial to the Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center as advancing “light years ahead.”

“Bringing the two campuses together has tremendous clinical advantages in terms of efficiency and our ability to take care of our patients,” Maas said. “This has been a long, long time in the process. I’ve been working on this over a decade.”

SPARKS FLY as iron worker Dana Sheldon works on the construction of the new Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center. The level of the downtown skyline in the background reveals that the new midtown Sacramento building has some notable height of its own. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

SPARKS FLY as iron worker Dana Sheldon works on the construction of the new Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center. The level of the downtown skyline in the background reveals that the new midtown Sacramento building has some notable height of its own. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

The construction of this building is the major part of the $724 million Sutter Medical Center campus project, which also includes the renovation of Sutter General Hospital and the construction of the Sutter Capitol Pavilion outpatient center, which was completed in August 2010.

Another recent Sutter project was the Sutter Community Garage, which includes 324,000 square feet of garage space and 9,000 square feet of retail. The 28th and N streets garage, which is available for hospital and public use, opened on Feb. 14, 2008.

During an interview with this publication on Oct. 13 – the anniversary marking three years since ground was broken for the women’s and children’s center – Tom McDearmid, the site supervisor for Boldt Construction, the general contractor for the new building, said that he was very impressed with the overall work and progress of the project.

“The whole mix of our team partnership out here has been working well together, and you can see that by the progress that we’re making,” McDearmid said. “It’s been a whole continuity of the design, the build and the owner. A year ago, we had a hole in the ground, so the progress has been unbelievable. And with no loss time injury on a site like this, with all this metal and steel and the height (of the building) is incredible. It’s unheard of, actually.”

Sutter’s ability to work with the neighboring business community has also proven to be a successful element of the project.

Kathy Dunlap, the chief operations officer of the Radiation Oncology Division of the Radiological Associates of Sacramento within the Sutter Cancer Center at 2800 L St., said that much coordination occurred between the radiation oncology center and the Sutter Medical Center in regard to the project.

WORKMEN stand high above the Capital City Freeway on the seventh floor of the under construction, 10-story Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

WORKMEN stand high above the Capital City Freeway on the seventh floor of the under construction, 10-story Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

“They’re actually building the hospital on top of our radiation oncology center,” Dunlap said. “We’re literally in what is called the basement of the Sutter Cancer Center, and so they literally had to build on top of us. That required the reinforcement of columns and doing all kinds of stuff. It’s taking a lot of work and coordination with Sutter to make sure that our services to patients were not disrupted. So, we’ve been working with Sutter for many years in order to get through a successful project. I think (the new building) is great for the community. This has been a vision for Sutter for a long time and I think for the whole campus that they’ve been working on. We treat Sutter’s patients for radiation oncology, so we have a very strong relationship with Sutter for the cancer center, so everything that they’re doing there is a good thing.”

Although actual work on the women’s and children’s center site recently reached its third year, the construction of the building is not scheduled to be completed until June 2013. However, about five months will be necessary following this time to gradually move into the facility, orient and train staff and move patients.

Progress on the building currently continues at a steady pace, as workers are diligently making strides toward completing the structure.

The new hospital building began receiving some of its glass windows during the week of Sept. 26.

The next step for the building is to complete its exterior “skin,” with the preliminary plan to have the first four floors of the structure fully enclosed by mid-November. This work will continue on the other floors, which are scheduled to be completed in this manner by sometime in January.

Once the building is enclosed, workers can begin the process of building walls and undergoing the finish work on the structure’s interior.

The new building will be connected to the present Sutter General Hospital via a three-story spanning structure.

THE NEW Sutter hospital building is being constructed just east of the Sutter Cancer Center. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

THE NEW Sutter hospital building is being constructed just east of the Sutter Cancer Center. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

And the bridging of these two buildings will also represent their recognition as one hospital.

Furthermore, the old Sutter General Hospital building will become known as the Ose Adams Medical Pavilion and will include 257 beds. And both buildings will jointly be a part of Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento.

Maas said that Sutter’s new, centralized hospital campus will mark a major advancement in health care services in the capital area.

“The new Sutter Medical Center will be a tremendous asset to the community in that we will have really the very best in health care on the campus, both from a technological perspective and from a facility that meets the needs of a health care consumer going forward,” Maas said. “As an example, private rooms that have family spaces in them, so that mom, dad can spend the night with the child that’s in the hospital or (another) loved one. Really, we will bring to Sacramento the first pediatric emergency department and a facility that is technologically state of the art.”

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS handle large sections of steel at the new center, which is scheduled to be completed in June 2013. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS handle large sections of steel at the new center, which is scheduled to be completed in June 2013. / Valley Community Newspapers photo, Lance Armstrong

Sacramento’s 1885 Floral Festival concluded with the gifting of the Crocker Art Gallery

 

Editor’s Note: This is the second article in a two-part series regarding Margaret Crocker.

 

One hundred and twenty-five years have passed since a grand celebration was held in honor of one of the city’s all-time greatest philanthropists, Margaret Crocker.

This May 6, 1885 photograph shows a western view of the interior of the Pavilion at 15th and N streets during the floral festival honoring Margaret Crocker. Near the center of the photograph are young girls dancing around a maypole, while a banner reading, “Lover of Our Homes,” hangs in the background. / Photo courtesy, Crocker Art Museum

This May 6, 1885 photograph shows a western view of the interior of the Pavilion at 15th and N streets during the floral festival honoring Margaret Crocker. Near the center of the photograph are young girls dancing around a maypole, while a banner reading, “Lover of Our Homes,” hangs in the background. / Photo courtesy, Crocker Art Museum

On the afternoon and evening of May 6, 1885, practically everyone in the city turned their attention to this woman who had donated so much for the good of Sacramento.

Among Margaret’s most notable contributions were her donations of a large tract of land to increase the size of the city cemetery, the Bell Conservatory (a large greenhouse structure that was built to supply flowers for the city cemetery), and the Marguerite Home, a home for “aged gentlewomen” at 1617 7th St.

As an extreme showing of gratitude for the generosity of Margaret, who was the wife of Judge Edwin Bryant Crocker, a well-known art collector and the brother of railroad baron Charles Crocker, a grand floral festival paid tribute to this self-sacrificing citizen.

Prior to this free-of-charge event, newspapers in and outside of Sacramento previewed the upcoming gathering and showered Margaret with much deserved compliments.

The San Jose Times-Mercury, for instance, published the following words regarding Margaret: “Her name for years has been the synonym of disinterested charity. She has shown by her works how worldly possessions can adorn a noble character. She has poured out her money in every conceivable channel of benevolence without ostentation. She has aided all public-spirited enterprises and has contributed without stint to adorn and beautify the city in which she lives. Her benefactions, which have known neither creed nor religion, amount to millions of dollars. Sacramento does well in honoring one so noble, and this testimonial by a grateful people will mark an epoch in the history of that city.”

The Colusa Sun echoed the words of the Times-Mercury and many other newspapers of the time through the following words: “Mrs. Margaret E. Crocker has endeared herself to the people of Sacramento by a long life studded with gems of charity. Her whole life has been one of charity and love for her fellow beings.”

And locally, the Sacramento Record-Union in its May 5, 1885 edition posed the question, “What more fitting oblation could they bring than these free gifts of nature, sweet lovely flowers?”

This floral display, which was a tribute from the Congregational Church, which was located at 909 6th St., was among the many exhibits that decorated the interior of the Pavilion on May 6, 1885. / Photo courtesy, Crocker Art Museum

This floral display, which was a tribute from the Congregational Church, which was located at 909 6th St., was among the many exhibits that decorated the interior of the Pavilion on May 6, 1885. / Photo courtesy, Crocker Art Museum

In likening Margaret to flowers – “Odors of Edeu and offerings divine” – the Record-Union published the following words: “Mrs. Margaret E. Crocker has wealth of gold, and like flowers, she distributes its {sic} brightness and its {sic} worth for the benefit of the sick, weary and homeless, and for the lovers of the beautiful. This will no doubt be the most magnificent floral fete in the world’s history.”

And in making it such an event, many people consistently worked for an entire week to prepare for the gathering, including those men and women who constructed the elaborate floral designs.

This latter work, which was enhanced by attached cards bearing words of affection for Margaret, was such an undertaking that the Record-Union of May 7, 1885 reported that “in no floral display were pieces of such magnitude ever attempted in this country.”

As the greatest demonstration of honor for a private citizen in the city’s history, the floral festival, which featured flowers from throughout the state, was held at 15th and N streets in the then-new Pavilion of the California State Agricultural Society on May 6, 1885.

On this day, every business was closed throughout the city and thousands of people gathered to pay tribute to Margaret, and many people, businesses and organizations that were unable to be present at the event sent letters of remembrances.

Those entering the Pavilion saw displays of flowers of every variety and hue throughout the building, pine, cedar and evergreen trees, hanging baskets of ferns and evergreens and large banners bearing the inscriptions, “Consort of Our City” and “Lover of Our Homes.”

The scene was illuminated by both gas and electric lights, with the latter being made possible through the introduction of electric lighting in the city during the previous year.

Electricity of a different kind entered the pavilion at 2:30 p.m., as Margaret and her party were greeted by about 3,000 children who created double lines at the Pavilion’s entrance.

A guard of honor consisting of 20 girls strewed flowers in the pathway of the procession.

After Margaret was escorted to her seat on the grandstand, the aforementioned children passed by Margaret and delivered floral offerings to the stage.

The afternoon program, which was attended by a crowd, which was widely estimated to have consisted of 12,000 to 20,000 people, featured tribute banners carried by local schools, musical presentations and a maypole dance by the young ladies’ guard of honor.

An even larger crowd, which was primarily composed of adults, arrived for an evening session.

Margaret was seated on the grandstand shortly after 8 p.m. and the program began with floral tributes, including a unique presentation in which members of the California Pioneers marched from a miniature model of Sutter’s Fort prior to presenting their floral offerings.

The Pavilion, which was located east of the state Capitol, was the site of a floral festival honoring Margaret Crocker on May 6, 1885. / Photo courtesy, the Lance Armstrong Collection

The Pavilion, which was located east of the state Capitol, was the site of a floral festival honoring Margaret Crocker on May 6, 1885. / Photo courtesy, the Lance Armstrong Collection

The program also consisted of musical performances, including a grand chorus performance by the Ladies Choral Society, Turner Harmonie and others, a speech made by George W. Chesley, president of the Sacramento Pioneer Association, and a maypole dance by the same young ladies who performed in the afternoon session.

But by far the most notable segment of the evening was Margaret’s gifting of the E.B. Crocker Art Gallery – presently the Crocker Art Museum – to the city of Sacramento and the California Museum Association “in trust for the public.”

Prior to handing Mayor John Q. Brown the key to the gallery, Margaret briefly addressed Brown.

This address included the following words: “Mayor Brown, in this midst of this sweet atmosphere of love and fragrance and upon this occasion – one of the happiest days of my life – it affords me great pleasure to make a formal delivery to you of the E.B. Crocker Art Gallery; the bestowal of which I feel sure I am but carrying out the wishes of my late husband, and the only wish I breathe as I bestow it is that great good may come to Sacramento by its possession.”

With the recent, $100 million, 125,000-square-foot expansion of the Crocker Art Museum, Margaret’s dream for the gallery has likely exceeded her wildest expectations, and coupled with the prosperity of the city cemetery, the name Margaret Crocker continues to be a name worthy of a grand celebration like the one held 125 years ago.

lance@valcomnews.com

Two million labor hours invested so far at Sac International Airport’s ‘Big Build’

SACRAMENTO – The Big Build, the largest capital improvement program in Sacramento County history, has surpassed two million labor hours invested in the program from June 2008 September 2010. To date, the hours have resulted in wages of over $75 million in paid wages.

“We would be unable to celebrate an on schedule and within budget status for the Big Build without the contributions of the talented team of contractors, subcontractors and the many men and women working on this project,” said Hardy Acree, director of airports. “We appreciate their contributions to a state-of-the-art facility that will serve this region for years to come.”

The Big Build is progressing quickly and safely. In March, prime contractor Austin-Walsh received the Cal/OSHA Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP). The Big Build has the lowest rate of incidents (3.1) and Days Away, Restricted or Transferred from Work (2.3). Industry-wide, the rate is normally 5.4 for incidents and 3.3 for Days Away, Restricted or Transferred from Work.

“This historic project is an economic boon to Sacramento County today and in the future,” said Roger Dickinson, chair of the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors. “Jobs created by the Big Build and the airport’s future growth are welcome, especially during this period of economic challenges.”

Over the course of the Big Build, 2400 jobs will be created and the construction program will produce $2 billion in economic impact for Sacramento County. By 2020, the new terminal is anticipated to have an annual impact of $2.6 billion and 16,500 jobs. The new terminal complex at Sacramento International Airport will open to the public in late 2011.

Sacramento International Airport was the 43rd busiest North American Airport in 2009 with approximately 8.9 million passengers. The Sacramento County Airport System is responsible for planning, developing, operating, and maintaining four of Sacramento County’s airports: Sacramento International Airport, Executive Airport, Mather Airport and Franklin Field. For more information on the County Airport System, visit www.sacairports.org.

Sacramento community celebrates Crocker expansion

Sacramento partied like it was 10-10-10 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. to celebrate the re-opening of the Crocker Art Museum and the grand opening of its 125,000 square-foot expansion.

Members of the public were treated to a wide variety of multicultural events, as well as a free day to tour the museum.

A perfect ‘10′ – Crocker Art Museum expansion opens on 10-10-10

 

 

A new era in the history of Sacramento’s famed Crocker Art Museum began Oct. 10, as the museum held a free, public opening celebration of its $100 million, 125,000-square-foot expansion.

The expansion of the Crocker Art Museum uses a muted color palette that is compatible with the original Victorian Italianate structure next door. / East Sacramento News photo,Tom Paniagua
The expansion of the Crocker Art Museum uses a muted color palette that is compatible with the original Victorian Italianate structure next door. / Valley Community Newspapers photo,Tom Paniagua

The event, which was held at the 216 O St. museum from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., allowed guests of the gathering to view the interior of the new expansion, which was designed by Gwathmey Siegel and Associates Architects.

Attractions included: the Sacramento Youth Jazz Band, the West Coast’s largest art car show, Kalanjali: Dance of India, Kennelly Irish Dance, Capital Roots and a laser show grand finale.

The Crocker Art Museum was founded in 1885. The long-awaited expansion, which tripled the size of the museum, features a series of special exhibits in its new galleries. These exhibits include works by the renowned Sacramento artist, Wayne Thiebaud.

Also on display are master drawings from the museum’s “pioneering collection” and a display of promised gifts to the museum such as French Barbizon paintings, Tang Dynasty sculpture, American impressionism and contemporary California art.

The opening of the museum expansion marked some 10 years since planning began and a little more than three years since the groundbreaking for the state-of-the-art expansion, which was considered a necessity for the museum for many years.

In addition to the Crocker’s new galleries for displaying temporary and permanent collections, the expansion includes a 260-seat, multi-purpose auditorium

Painter Cody Harris puts the finishing touches on the walls of the newly expanded Crocker Art Museum. / East Sacramento News photo,Tom Paniagua

Painter Cody Harris puts the finishing touches on the walls of the newly expanded Crocker Art Museum. / Valley Community Newspapers photo,Tom Paniagua

 for films, concerts and lectures, the Bobbin and Patrick Mulvaney-operated Crocker Café with free Wi-Fi, a courtyard and a museum store.

Lial Jones, the museum’s director, emphasized that although much focus has been placed on the construction of the expansion and the grand opening festivities, the opening of Crocker’s much-anticipated addition certainly marks only the beginning of the new Crocker’s offerings.

“The whole idea of (the public opening celebration) is that’s what starts people coming here and continuing to come (to the museum),” said Jones, who was instrumental in launching the $100 million capital campaign to support the expansion.

The Crocker will offer plenty of attractions to keep the public continuously interested in visiting the museum. These offerings include various educational and community programs and a wide range of temporary exhibits.

The Crocker Art Museum is open to the public on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Fridays through Sundays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For additional information about the Crocker Art Museum, visit www.newcrocker.org.