Arden-Carmichael neighborhood nonprofits enjoy good turnout from the Big Day of Giving

 Effie Yeaw guide Melanie DuBoce spoke about the trees of Deterding Woods on Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014 as part of the New Year’s walk along the river event. Effie Yeaw participated in this year's Big Day of Giving, which was held on Tuesday, May 5.  /  Photo by Monica Stark
Effie Yeaw guide Melanie DuBoce spoke about the trees of Deterding Woods on Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014 as part of the New Year’s walk along the river event. Effie Yeaw participated in this year's Big Day of Giving, which was held on Tuesday, May 5. / Photo by Monica Stark

The Sacramento region did it again for this year’s Big Day of Giving, which was held on May 5. With a regional goal of raising $5 million for local nonprofits, that target amount was smashed, totaling $5,613,799.; 36,531 donations were accepted and 529 local nonprofits participated. The folks at Big DOG are in the process of verifying all gifts and incentives for participating organizations (dollars, transactions, households, etc.). They anticipate this to be completed by June 30. Once their verification process is complete, they will announce the final numbers. What follows are Arden-Carmichael area results from the Big DOG website, which are still subject to final review and verification.

The American River Natural History Association and the Effie Yeaw Nature Center,

2850 San Lorenzo Way, Carmichael, are dedicated to bringing awareness of the beauty and diversity of the natural world to children, families and the community through education initiatives that foster appreciation, enjoyment and stewardship of the unique wildlife. There were 210 donations, totaling $20,010.

It is the mission of

St. Michael’s Episcopal Day School,

2140 Mission Ave., Carmichael, to provide a learning environment where students are inspired to think critically; act responsibly; lead compassionately; and innovate wisely in seeking scholastic, artistic and physical achievement. There were 15 donations, totaling $10,985.

Sacramento Fine Arts Center,

5330B Gibbons Dr., Carmichael, encourages the creation and presentation of original visual arts, to support the cultural life of the community, and to encourage all artists to fulfill their potential. There were 61 donations, totaling $5,500.

Women’s Wisdom ART,

5230 Whitney Ave., Carmichael, is dedicated to transforming the lives of women by inviting them to engage in a community dedicated to participating in the arts.  We believe that the images and words women create to express their lives enrich not only themselves and their families, but our entire community. There were 86 donations, totaling $7,890.

Eskaton Foundation,

5105 Manzanita Ave., Carmichael, funds essential projects and innovative programs in order to enhance the quality of life of seniors. The older adults we serve enjoy greater independence, dignity and health, whether they are living in an Eskaton retirement community, residing in Eskaton’s affordable housing. There were 40 donations, totaling $3,475.

The mission of

Chautauqua Playhouse,

5325 Engle Road Suite 110, is to actively develop and promote educational and cultural involvement and awareness in the performing arts by offering the general public a wide-variety of high quality, affordable performing art opportunities that encourage diversity, and original works. There were 47 donations, totaling $7,210.

Atkinson Family Services,

4718 Engle Road, Carmichael, protects, nurtures, and inspires children, adults, and families to be successful through residential, behavioral health, educational, and vocational programs promoting personal growth and development. There were 13 donations, totaling $725.

American River Parkway Foundation,

5700 Arden Way, Carmichael, established in 1983, serves the Sacramento community with programs that span a 23 mile, 4,800 acre expanse of land, water and nature. The vision is to conserve and improve the parkway as a sustainable natural resource to all. There were 175 donations, totaling $16,045.

Sacramento Valley Conservancy’s

mission is to preserve the beauty, character and diversity of the Sacramento Valley landscape by working with citizens, property owners, developers, public agencies and other nonprofit organizations. It preserves dedicated open space by the acceptance of gifts, private purchase, facilitation of public acquisition, conservation easements and by cooperative efforts. In 2012, it added the old Boy Scout camp, Camp Pollock to the heart of the American River Parkway, making recreation for youth, parkway users and community events the main goals of the acquisition. There were 121 donations, totaling $13,065.

editor@valcomnews.com

Pocket area area nonprofits gear up for the May 5 BIG Day of Giving

For 24 hours on May 5, Sacramento will again come together for a BIG Day of Giving. According to the Big DOG website, the goal is to raise $5 million from 25,000 donors for over 500 nonprofits in a 24-hour giving challenge as part of the national campaign called GiveLocalAmerica. To participate, local donors can go to http://www.bigdayofgiving.org to give and support the nonprofits. In 2014, our region’s BIG Day of Giving raised more than $3 million from more than 12,000 donors for 400 nonprofits and ranked No. 2 in the nation. Let’s make it No. 1 this year.

On www.bigdayofgiving is a powerful online community tool called Giving Edge and it can help you find nonprofit organizations, learn about the impact they are making, and make a donation. Each nonprofit in the database is a partner of GiveLocalNow, a movement to increase local giving.

What follows below is a listing of Pocket area nonprofits that are participating in the Big Day of Giving. The listing also includes links to the organizations’ Giving Edge profiles.

Meals on Wheels by ACC

, 7375 Park City Dr., promotes the general welfare and to enhance the quality of life for older adults by identifying, developing, and providing culturally sensitive nutritious meals and related activities.

Carrie’s TOUCH, Inc.

, 372 Florin Road, No. 197, breaks the silence that adversely impacts the African American community with regard to breast cancer in order to significantly increase the number of survivors.

Capitol INDIE Collective

, 7485 Rush River Dr., provides education and a platform for independent artists to be inspired, practice their art form, and deliver compelling works of art making impact with personal meaning and social relevance from several different disciplines, backgrounds, and demographics.

ACC Senior Services

, 7334 Park City Dr., promotes the general welfare and enhance the quality of life for our community by identifying, developing and providing culturally sensitive health and social services for older adults.

JFK PACE Parent Committee

, 6715 Gloria Dr., is a Small Learning Community (SLC) at John F. Kennedy High School. PACE offers students a four-year rigorous academic program with an emphasis on Advanced Placement classes in math, science, English, history, and Foreign Language.

Sacramento’s 1885 Floral Festival concluded with the gifting of the Crocker Art Gallery

 

Editor’s Note: This is the second article in a two-part series regarding Margaret Crocker.

 

One hundred and twenty-five years have passed since a grand celebration was held in honor of one of the city’s all-time greatest philanthropists, Margaret Crocker.

This May 6, 1885 photograph shows a western view of the interior of the Pavilion at 15th and N streets during the floral festival honoring Margaret Crocker. Near the center of the photograph are young girls dancing around a maypole, while a banner reading, “Lover of Our Homes,” hangs in the background. / Photo courtesy, Crocker Art Museum

This May 6, 1885 photograph shows a western view of the interior of the Pavilion at 15th and N streets during the floral festival honoring Margaret Crocker. Near the center of the photograph are young girls dancing around a maypole, while a banner reading, “Lover of Our Homes,” hangs in the background. / Photo courtesy, Crocker Art Museum

On the afternoon and evening of May 6, 1885, practically everyone in the city turned their attention to this woman who had donated so much for the good of Sacramento.

Among Margaret’s most notable contributions were her donations of a large tract of land to increase the size of the city cemetery, the Bell Conservatory (a large greenhouse structure that was built to supply flowers for the city cemetery), and the Marguerite Home, a home for “aged gentlewomen” at 1617 7th St.

As an extreme showing of gratitude for the generosity of Margaret, who was the wife of Judge Edwin Bryant Crocker, a well-known art collector and the brother of railroad baron Charles Crocker, a grand floral festival paid tribute to this self-sacrificing citizen.

Prior to this free-of-charge event, newspapers in and outside of Sacramento previewed the upcoming gathering and showered Margaret with much deserved compliments.

The San Jose Times-Mercury, for instance, published the following words regarding Margaret: “Her name for years has been the synonym of disinterested charity. She has shown by her works how worldly possessions can adorn a noble character. She has poured out her money in every conceivable channel of benevolence without ostentation. She has aided all public-spirited enterprises and has contributed without stint to adorn and beautify the city in which she lives. Her benefactions, which have known neither creed nor religion, amount to millions of dollars. Sacramento does well in honoring one so noble, and this testimonial by a grateful people will mark an epoch in the history of that city.”

The Colusa Sun echoed the words of the Times-Mercury and many other newspapers of the time through the following words: “Mrs. Margaret E. Crocker has endeared herself to the people of Sacramento by a long life studded with gems of charity. Her whole life has been one of charity and love for her fellow beings.”

And locally, the Sacramento Record-Union in its May 5, 1885 edition posed the question, “What more fitting oblation could they bring than these free gifts of nature, sweet lovely flowers?”

This floral display, which was a tribute from the Congregational Church, which was located at 909 6th St., was among the many exhibits that decorated the interior of the Pavilion on May 6, 1885. / Photo courtesy, Crocker Art Museum

This floral display, which was a tribute from the Congregational Church, which was located at 909 6th St., was among the many exhibits that decorated the interior of the Pavilion on May 6, 1885. / Photo courtesy, Crocker Art Museum

In likening Margaret to flowers – “Odors of Edeu and offerings divine” – the Record-Union published the following words: “Mrs. Margaret E. Crocker has wealth of gold, and like flowers, she distributes its {sic} brightness and its {sic} worth for the benefit of the sick, weary and homeless, and for the lovers of the beautiful. This will no doubt be the most magnificent floral fete in the world’s history.”

And in making it such an event, many people consistently worked for an entire week to prepare for the gathering, including those men and women who constructed the elaborate floral designs.

This latter work, which was enhanced by attached cards bearing words of affection for Margaret, was such an undertaking that the Record-Union of May 7, 1885 reported that “in no floral display were pieces of such magnitude ever attempted in this country.”

As the greatest demonstration of honor for a private citizen in the city’s history, the floral festival, which featured flowers from throughout the state, was held at 15th and N streets in the then-new Pavilion of the California State Agricultural Society on May 6, 1885.

On this day, every business was closed throughout the city and thousands of people gathered to pay tribute to Margaret, and many people, businesses and organizations that were unable to be present at the event sent letters of remembrances.

Those entering the Pavilion saw displays of flowers of every variety and hue throughout the building, pine, cedar and evergreen trees, hanging baskets of ferns and evergreens and large banners bearing the inscriptions, “Consort of Our City” and “Lover of Our Homes.”

The scene was illuminated by both gas and electric lights, with the latter being made possible through the introduction of electric lighting in the city during the previous year.

Electricity of a different kind entered the pavilion at 2:30 p.m., as Margaret and her party were greeted by about 3,000 children who created double lines at the Pavilion’s entrance.

A guard of honor consisting of 20 girls strewed flowers in the pathway of the procession.

After Margaret was escorted to her seat on the grandstand, the aforementioned children passed by Margaret and delivered floral offerings to the stage.

The afternoon program, which was attended by a crowd, which was widely estimated to have consisted of 12,000 to 20,000 people, featured tribute banners carried by local schools, musical presentations and a maypole dance by the young ladies’ guard of honor.

An even larger crowd, which was primarily composed of adults, arrived for an evening session.

Margaret was seated on the grandstand shortly after 8 p.m. and the program began with floral tributes, including a unique presentation in which members of the California Pioneers marched from a miniature model of Sutter’s Fort prior to presenting their floral offerings.

The Pavilion, which was located east of the state Capitol, was the site of a floral festival honoring Margaret Crocker on May 6, 1885. / Photo courtesy, the Lance Armstrong Collection

The Pavilion, which was located east of the state Capitol, was the site of a floral festival honoring Margaret Crocker on May 6, 1885. / Photo courtesy, the Lance Armstrong Collection

The program also consisted of musical performances, including a grand chorus performance by the Ladies Choral Society, Turner Harmonie and others, a speech made by George W. Chesley, president of the Sacramento Pioneer Association, and a maypole dance by the same young ladies who performed in the afternoon session.

But by far the most notable segment of the evening was Margaret’s gifting of the E.B. Crocker Art Gallery – presently the Crocker Art Museum – to the city of Sacramento and the California Museum Association “in trust for the public.”

Prior to handing Mayor John Q. Brown the key to the gallery, Margaret briefly addressed Brown.

This address included the following words: “Mayor Brown, in this midst of this sweet atmosphere of love and fragrance and upon this occasion – one of the happiest days of my life – it affords me great pleasure to make a formal delivery to you of the E.B. Crocker Art Gallery; the bestowal of which I feel sure I am but carrying out the wishes of my late husband, and the only wish I breathe as I bestow it is that great good may come to Sacramento by its possession.”

With the recent, $100 million, 125,000-square-foot expansion of the Crocker Art Museum, Margaret’s dream for the gallery has likely exceeded her wildest expectations, and coupled with the prosperity of the city cemetery, the name Margaret Crocker continues to be a name worthy of a grand celebration like the one held 125 years ago.

lance@valcomnews.com

Donate a coat and receive free admission to Fairytale Town

SACRAMENTO – Fairytale Town is accepting coats for the News 10’s Coats for Kids, serving as an official drop-off site.

To help inspire the spirit of giving for children and families, Fairytale Town will offer one free child’s admission per coat, with a paying adult. The collection will run through Nov. 28, during operating hours. The collected coats will then be delivered to the News 10 Station.

The News 10’s Coats for Kids drive is celebrating 20 years of collecting coats to help families in the Sacramento area. The drive asks for a donation of new or gently used coats.

Over the last 19 years donors have helped collect and distribute more than 475,000 coats to children and families in need. The News 10’s Coats for Kids goal this year is 25,000 donations to make it to the one half million mark.

“The News 10’s Coasts for Kids drive is a great program, and we are happy to serve as an official drop-off location and extend free admission to encourage participation and donations,” said Sharlene Lal-Hernandez, education and program manager of Fairytale Town.

Coats can also be dropped off at Swansons Cleaners, Rogers Jewelry Co., Century 21 M&M and Associates or the News 10 Studios.

For more information call (916) 808-7462 or visit www.fairytaletown.org.